NEBSI & System Dynamics

October 26, 2017

We like to say that, “A house is a system”.  If you change one thing in a system, something else is likely to change.  It’s not always something that you are expecting to change.  The spotlight over the sink in the kitchen may generate enough heat on the surface of the roof above to melt the snow. The water runs down the roof and freezes, creating an ice dam.  The water backs up under the shingles and runs down inside the wall cavity and shows up in the basement.

Consider the house as a thermal system.  When it’s colder outside than it is inside, the house loses heat and cools.  It will continue to cool until the inside temperature reaches the outside temperature.  The regulator is the ability of the structure to resist the flow of heat.  A heating sVensim House Temp1ource in the house moderates the flow. The loops in the system can be modelled mathematically; each loop impacts the others in a model that can be increasingly complex as details are added.

Consider the occupants in a house.  If you consider their health as similar to the temperature, if there is carbon monoxide in the house, the more CO the more dangerous the environment.  The system loop is simple to predict – the more CO the more impact.  The cause of the CO is the driver of the loop.  Determining the cause of the CO requires knowledge of what creates CO.  The analyst who determines the cause needs to be trained.  The more knowledgeable the analyst the more the correct cause will be determined.

The loops continue to flow out, driving just this one aspect of the health in a house.  The occupants need to understand that they should not take the batteries out of the CO detector.  The code officials need to know that CO can be caused in a house and enact legislation that CO detectors are required.  Code officials have to confirm that the regulations have been complied with.  Insurance companies need to know that the occupants of the house won’t be at risk.

All of these complex loops can be modelled so that the system can be made understandable, any missing elements determined, and the most important points highlighted.  Where would more training make the most impact?  The more participants who understand the systems, the greater the impact on making homes safer, more comfortable, more affordable, more desirable, healthier, and more energy efficient.

The NorthEast Building Science Institute (NEBSI) is based on developing such understanding and making the connections and improving the system.

NorthEast Building Science Institute (NEBSI)

Systems Dynamics Society

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The End of Manners and Magic Words

October 9, 2017

Did you ever think you would find yourself talking to an inanimate object?  Yelling at the TV is one thing or kicking the car in frustration.  But talking to an inanimate object that talks back and answers questions like “What’s the weather today?” or “What was the score of the Red Sox game?” and expecting it to answer in a sultry, human voice?  You can even ask personal questions like, “What are you wearing?” or “What is the meaning of life?” and get answers.

We strove to get our children to use the ‘magic word‘ when they asked for things like “Please, can I stay up?” or “Please, can I have ice cream?” rather than just demanding.  But children are human after all.  These talking objects are . . . objects?  Even if they don’t sound like objects and who knows what they are really listening to.

And what about the other bit of manners like “thank you” or “you’re welcome”?  When I thank one of these objects the voice inside never says “you’re welcome”.

So are these machines eliminating one more layer of manners like men removing their hats or caps when they come indoors or walking on the street side of their female companion?  Will people just be ordering each other around, never using the magic word?  Or is the line between animate and inanimate intelligence clear enough that it won’t cause a problem?

Words like please and thank you help to make the social world we cohabit friendlier.  They show respect.  We seem to be eliminating many levels of politeness, respect, and privacy while we have created recording devices that don’t forget anything. (You can burn a box of private letters but email is there . . . somewhere . . . forever.)  Is that really okay?  It takes a little effort to say please, or acknowledge a little respect with thank you, but that seems like a small price to pay for a civil society.  As Emily Post said, “Etiquette is the science of living.  It embraces everything.  It is ethics.  It is honor.”

 

Garden Fresh Salad

June 30, 2017

The problem is adjectives – adjectives and reality TV shows.  Garden fresh salad sounds much better than . . . salad.    Crisp green lettuce.  You can almost feel the crunch.  The same thing is true for people.  When we start calling people lying this and crooked that, itfresh-garden-salad defines the message that is coming next.  Which, of course, is exactly the point. But how can you have a civil and productive conversation with someone or about something if you’ve smeared it with a negative adjective?  The objections to some person or cause should be defined by the facts.  Facts are nouns.

What if the Declaration of Independence was peppered with adjectives?

When in the marvelous Course of wonderful human events it becomes necessary for one outstanding people to dissolve the crooked political bands which have connected them with another who is slimy, no-good, and worthless and to assume among the exceptional powers of the gonna-be-wonderful earth the separate and equal (and in our case, winning) station to which the Laws of Nature and Nature’s God entitle them, a decent (but unnecessary) respect to the fake opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the brilliant-just-and-truly-wonderful causes which impel them to this radical but excellent separation.

And if some event or participant is the winner then some other event or participant is the loser.  Winner and loser are also adjectives driven into popular vernacular by reality TV shows.  We need to stop thinking in terms of winners and losers when it comes to national policies.  A great school system is great for all.  A great health care system is great for the entire system in so many ways.

A country and the passage of time is NOT a TV show.  This is a country of people, citizens, people living and working and pursuing happiness and liberty together.  Not as Republicans or Democrats or Independents or some other party or affiliation or religion, but as Americans.  A Senator in Massachusetts or Georgia or Montana represents the citizens of that state, but they also represent the citizens of the United States.  And that is THE important adjective: UNITED.

Angry Air!

June 7, 2017

John Tooley said, “Air is like crooked rivers, crooked people, teenagers, and cheap labor.  It always seeks the path of least resistance.”  He didn’t say that Angry air is Noisy air.   Air doesn’t like being forced through corrugated, flexible ducting, pushed around corners, and made to force open dampers.  It resists being made to perform in a way that it doesn’t want to.  It takes more and more force as the resistance increases.  Air is just fine when you just let it move at will.  It can become amazingly strong as any building that has met a hurricane or tornado can attest to.  And as objects like asteroids and space capsules hurtle through the atmosphere they burn up!

ASHRAE 62.2 requires bathroom fans to make no more noise than a quiet refrigerator in a quiet kitchen: 1 sone or less.  And if you put an Energy Star bathroom fan on the bench and plug it in, you can barely hear it.  It’s amazingly quiet.  “Is it running?” people ask.  And it is.  So how come once you install the fan in the ceiling it gets uncomfortably loud?

Fan manufacturers not only made these fans quiet, they put DC motors in them that are extremely tolerant ofchanges in pressure.  As the pressure increases in the installation, the fan motor compensates by using more power to increase the speed of the spinning wheel that is pushing the air.  (Notice the curve on this graph that starts on on the left side and then drops off the cliff at about 75 cfm.  It has about the same airflow from 0.45 iwg as it does at 0.0 iwg!)  That’s a wonderful thing because people can install the fans horribly and step on the duct and lots of other nasty things and still come out with the same airflow . . . but not the same sound level.  What was really, really quiet is now uncomfortably loud.  And as houses get tighter they get quieter and a noisy fan is annoying which is why so much effort was made to get them quiet so they could run all the time without bothering anyone!

I have found that builders get aggravated because these quiet and expensive fans that they have been compelled to install really aren’t all that quiet.  And they should be quiet.  They have been designed to be quiet.  Tested to be quiet.  And if you disconnect them from the installation, they are quiet.

So here’s a simple way to determine if the fan is working right: listen to it.  If the air is angry, it will be noisy and noisy DC fans equal bad installation.  The air is yelling at you.  I have found ducts filled with the foam that was sprayed on the house for insulation.  Backdraft dampers remain taped closed.  Ducts terminated against a wall or floor in the attic and don’t actually get to the outside.  If a bathroom fan that is rated to be < 0.3 sones is noisy, its a bad installation.  Period.  Fix it.  It may still be moving enough air to meet the ventilation requirements, but if it is noisy the homeowner will find a way to turn it off and stuff it full of socks.  Then the air in the house will get bad and people will get sick.  And the occupants will get angrier than the air!  And the really dumb thing is that all these codes and standards and mathematical computations and formulas to size the fan correctly mean absolutely nothing if the fan is turned off.

What do you know about your house’s nose?

January 19, 2017

What’s special about an exterior vent hood or cap or (if you want to be technical) termination fitting?  That’s like asking what’s special about a nose?  Without vent caps the air would not leave the house in an orderly fashion.  Just like the air coming out of your lungs.  When your nose is stopped up, it’s hard to breathe.  The same is true with a vent cap.  If a dryer vent cap is full of lint, the air has a hard time getting out of the dryer.  And that’s a shame because it is the movement of air that allows the clothes to dry.  Lint traps don’t always work very well despite the enthusiasm that dryer manufacturers have for them.

wc-series-wall-cap-building-envelope-rainscreen-225x225But I want to tell you about a very special wall cap made by Primex.  This one is meant to be connected to 4″ ducting.  Nothing really special there.  So what is special?  Well, for one thing the 4″ duct is meant to slide inside the throat on this fitting.  As duct pieces are fitted together, the first piece is meant to fit inside the second piece, the second piece inside the third and so on.  Why?  Because if the first piece fits outside the second piece, any gaps or cracks will spill air outside the duct because the pressure is on the upstream side.

What else is special about this vent cap?  The mounting flange and the outside collar are all made of one piece so water can’t come in.  And yet the hood itself can be unscrewed from the flange for cleaning and service.  The flange can remain permanently attached to the wall!

It also has an very good, gravity return back-draft damper and bird screen both of which can be removed (the damper snaps out, the screen has to be cut out).

But the best part is the curve of the hood itself.  This curve gently eases the air out of the end of the duct.  A lot of caps have very abrupt exits and that increases the resistance.  Resistance in these products can be simulated by the number of equivalent feet of straight,

p1000260

Poor Quality Vent Caps

rigid ducting.  Some hoods can have equivalent lengths of 60 or 70 feet!  This hood has an equivalent length of just 25 feet.  Air has to trundle along the duct, bounce around corners, and rattle away over the corrugations of flex duct.  And when at last it gets to the termination fitting, it is compelled to make one last turn while pushing open the damper and then exit to freedom!  You want to make that as easy as possible.

Oh, one more thing . . . two more things: the cap is made of durable UV-protected polymer resin that lasts a really long time and, two,  it comes in a multitude of colors – white, taupe, black, light gray, tan, and (on special order) dark gray and dark brown.

Think about it. PRMX-WC401

What is my house doing to me?

November 22, 2016

Fall River, MA

hhe-kitchen-hazards“Why do I wake up in the morning with a headache?”  “Why is the house so dry in the winter?”  “What are VOCs?”  “Does my house have a radon problem?”  Can you answer all these questions?  When we do an energy audit on a home, we are looking for issues that impact the heating and cooling loads.  But the same tools that we use for thermal analysis can be used to highlight unhealthy or hazardous conditions in a house.  The BPI Healthy Home Evaluator (HHE) certification merges energy efficiency and home health together.

On Tuesday the 15th and Wednesday the 16th of November, a first in the nation BPI HHE class was held at Bristol Community College.  The BPI credential was developed in partnership with the Green & Healthy Homes Initiative.  “It builds upon the BPI Building Analyst (BA), Energy Auditor (EA), and/orbpi-logo-4c Quality Control Inspector (QCI) certifications to verify competencies required to conduct in-depth healthy home environmental risk assessments.  The Healthy Home Evaluator assesses home-based environmental health and safety hazards and provides a prioritized list of recommendations to address those hazards.”

The two day class extensively reviewed numerous aspects of HHE skills including the liability issues involved in stepping into a hazards and health analysis, resident interviews, the identification and interpretation of hazards, and the seven “Keep Its” developed to clarify the primary elements of the program:

Keep it:

  1. Dry
  2. Clean
  3. Safe
  4. Ventilated
  5. Pest-free
  6. Contaminant-free
  7. Maintained

The class was able to apply these techniques to the test cabin located in the BCC weatherization laboratory while going through a typical field analysis incgas-leaksluding gas leak detection, CO monitoring, combustion safety testing, blower door testing, and ventilation system verification.  Added to these was asbestos pipe insulation, messy counters including cigarettes and spilled coffee, long blind cords, children’s toys in the oven, toxic chemicals in a cabinet, and a hazardous carpet.  These hazards were so common and obvious that the students missed many of them despite the fact that they had been sensitized to seeking them out.  Like odor fatigue, elements such as these are so common in an energy audit that they are simply overlooked.

What are the Lower Explosive Limits for natural gas, propane, and gasoline?  What is the impact on house pressures of a blocked return air vent?  Is it a water stain on the ceiling or sign of a mouse nest in the attic?  There are dozens of questions about a house.  Some of them are no problem at all.  Some of them are chronic, long term problems, and some of the are acute problems (like CO) that should be addressed immediately.

This is an evaluation credential.  There is so much to know about this stuff that it will take years of testing and experience to know the ins and outs.  But if we can get homes safer and healthier it will save a great deal on medical care which should appeal to health insurance companies and all of us.

If you wanbristol-community-college-1t to learn more about this stuff, Bristol Community College will be conducting more of these classes at 1082 Davol Street, Fall River, MA 02720 – 774-357-3644

Healthy Home Evaluator Training

October 13, 2016

Fall River, MA     October 13, 2016

hhe-class2_troost-avenue For two days – November 15th and 16th – Paul Raymer of Heyoka Solutions will be teaching a pilot of the BPI HHE course at the Fall River campus of Bristol Community College (BCC).  The purpose of this course is to blend the knowledge of building science with the ability to recognize home environmental risks.

For years qualified building scientists have been striving to make homes more energy efficient.  The same tools can be used to recognize a healthy home environment.  Using their building science knowledge, students taking this course will connect what they already know to environmental concerns that are being overlooked.  The class, based on a course developed by Healthy Housing Solutions, is a combination of classroom sessions, group exercises, hands-on tool use, and situation analysis in BCC’s unique test cabin.  This class will review basic building science fundamentals and analysis tools that are used to apply the six Keep It principles: Keep It Dry, Keep It Ventilated, Keep It Clean, Keep It Pest Free, Keep It Safe, and Keep It Contaminant Free.

What is Integrated Pest Management?  What if the homeowner says the house is too dry?  What does that mean for energy use?  What does that mean for health impacts?  What impact do air fresheners have on the environment?  What impact do they have on energy efficiency?  What elements of a home environment might impact asthma in children?  What issues are chronic?  What issues are critical and an Immediate Danger to Life?

Consider healthy home evaluation an investigation, like CSI.  Understanding building science fundamentals can be lead to a clarification of a healthy environment.  A house is a system.  It’s all connected.hhe-class1_troost-avenue

Upon completion of the course students will be ready to challenge the BPI HHE 1.5 hour certification exam offered on November 17th.  Class will be held at  BCC – 1082 Davol Street – Fall River, MA  Phone: 774-357-3644

Contact Rosemary Senra at BCC for more information.  Rosemary.senra@bristolcc.edu

Teaching is a Privelege

June 8, 2015

Teaching is an honor and a privilege.  I know something and you want to learn it and you are Labrador Classroomwilling to listen to me define, describe, demonstrate, and pass on the information in my mind into your mind.  Wow!

When I was in school, the teachers or instructors or professors were the authorities.  They could throw chalk at me if I dozed off.  I had to be there.  It was a requirement.  They were in charge.  I didn’t understand much of what they were babbling about.  But in fact, teachers don’t have jobs if there aren’t students.  The teacher works for the student.  It works like the Vulcan Mind-meld in Star Trek without the touching.  The students should not sit there passively just listening.  They should be actively engaged in the transfer of information. And if they don’t understand a point, they should make the teacher or instructor or professor explain it another way until it makes sense . . . until it is clear, equally clear in both minds.  I never had a teacher explain that he/she was working for me.

John Krigger says that “teaching is not proving how smart you are”.   And he’s right.  There is a definite sense of power standing in front of an audience of eager faces, hanging on your every word.  And it is tempting to drop names and connections of the famous and powerful whether you know them or not, puffing up your character.  There is a point for a teacher to establish their credentials.  But as my grandmother used to say, “Enough is as good as a feast!”  We all like to be taught by recognized authorities.  The point is not who you are but your ability and skill to transfer the information.  If you know a lot, you have a duty to pass it on.

My first teaching experience was in a one room school on the coast of Labrador.  It was the extreme authority experience.  I was just 22.  Straight out of college with no teaching training.  When the ship I came in and dropped me off, they started ringing the church bell in the town.  I learned later that they expected me to hold a service.  Tradition was that the teacher was the authority figure in the town.  The teacher made the rules . . . for the whole town!  It was akin to being the king.  No one had explained that to me so I didn’t know the tradition.  But I felt it in the respect they gave me.

It took me a lot of years to get back to teaching and even more years to understand the honor and privilege that it is to be allowed to do it.  I learn more every single time I teach.


If you are planning to challenge the BPI Quality Control Inspector’s certification, you might find the Quality Control Inspector’s Residential Handbook helpful.  Scheduled for publication on June 1, 2015.  For updates and a discount on publication, please add your name and email address by clicking on the book below.

QCI Handbook Cover copy

Visit us at www.HeyokaSolutions.com

TV Sets, Homes, and QCI

May 18, 2015

I have had the pleasure of talking to a lot of wonderful people about the challenges of the BPI QCI CertificHomeowner checkation, and I am getting some unique insight.  I started out working on my book – Residential QCI Handbook on a quest to help candidates who are preparing to take the exam.  I wanted to get a clearer picture of how to prepare for the exam, what to study, what to learn, and what to brush up on.  But there is a lot more to it than just sharpening your pencil or memorizing a table.

For one thing, there is a lot to being a Quality Control Inspector for homes.  Early in my career I worked as a technician in a company that made television sets.  Electronic components were stuffed by hand into circuit boards.  Hardware components were mounted on large, copper back plates, wires were run between point A and point B . . . and C, D, E, F, G, etc.  Lots of wires.  For awhile I had to solder those wires in place.  Individual components like the power supplies and the channel tuners were tested at individual stations.  And then the whole thing was put together, shaken for a half hour to see if everything would stay in place, and then turned on and aligned and then put in a box to be shipped.  Every person in the process had something to do with making that TV set work . . . every person from the person who stuffed the resistors into the holes on the circuit boards to the final test technician who made sure that it actually would work when it arrived in someone’s home played a role in the success or failure of the product.

I started out connecting wires, but I ended up performing the final alignment – performing the final quality control on each television.  There were a lot of smart people putting those things together, but the level of risk was small.  If the TV set didn’t work, people in a bar weren’t going to able to watch the 3 Stooges!  (They told me that when I was doing field service.)  If someone doesn’t properly check the spillage on a water heater in a house, a family could die.

Quality Control for homes is a lot more serious than quality control for TV sets.  Over and over again as I have talked to people I heard that the economic rewards for the job are barely considered.  The rewards are emotional.  Clients are grateful when their homes are more comfortable and the heating bills lower.

So that’s another thing.  I had heard that candidates struggle with the “soft skills” questions on the written test.  It’s very difficult to write “soft skills” questions that have only one right answer.  Those are generally the questions that attorneys answer by saying, “Well, it depends!”  How do you assess client satisfaction?  You talk to them.  We don’t do this work ON clients.  We do this work WITH clients.  The crew and the weatherization agency brings the skills and that has to blend with requirements of the house and the people who live there.  It is all one beautiful, functional entity.  It’s like the TV sets I worked on only much more significant.  Most of those TV sets that I worked on back in the 1970’s are in the dump by now.  Houses will be around for a few hundred years.

100217_4760Tamasin Sterner of PureEnergy Coach told me that you can’t have an ego to be a Quality Control Inspector.  It’s just not about you.

You, however, will provide the final quality control checks on my book.  I am honored to have been certified as a QCI Master Trainer by IREC.  I am honored to have been able to talk to a lot of people for the contents of the book.  I have tried to pull together a lot of useful knowledge and tools to get the job done.  But there is so much out there that it is overwhelming.  You really need to know a lot to be good at this job.  For those of you who are about to challenge the QCI exam, take courage, eat some dark chocolate (Amanda Hatherly mentioned that), and believe in yourself and what you are doing.



 

If you are planning to challenge the BPI Quality Control Inspector’s certification, you might find the Quality Control Inspector’s Residential Handbook helpful.  Scheduled for publication on June 1, 2015.  For updates and a discount on publication, please add your name and email address by clicking on the book below.

QCI Handbook Cover copy

Visit us at www.HeyokaSolutions.com

Shades of Gray in Residential Construction Morality

April 27, 2015

I was called in to perform a last minute duct test for a modular home builder.  He was all in a dither to have a duct test and a blower door test done on a Friday so that he could get his Certificate of Occupancy (CO) so the homeowner could move in the following Monday.  He said that he’d just found out that he needed these tests.  The building inspector asked for them at the last minute!

I was glad to do it partially because it’s good to have builders aware of what is going on despite the fact that he might have been warned for the past year or more that the code had changed.  General awareness of these changes take time.  After all, this wasn’t the first house that he had built since the new codes went into effect, but this was obviously the first building inspector who had made him do it.  The 2012 IECC is quite demanding in contrast to the 2009 version, and it is clear that builders can’t just build the way they used to.  The IECC requires 3 ACH50 and ducts that leak no more than 4 cfm per 100 square feet.  This house leaked at over 7 ACH50 and the ducts were at just under 9 cfm per 100 square feet.

So the builder ran around with a caulking gun.  He stuffed paper towel under the basement door.  He pulled off electrical receptacle covers and installed those little foam pads.  And then he looked at me.  This is the point where the rubber meets the road as a Quality Control Inspector.  The house performed better than many houses that have been built over the years.  It wasn’t likely to explode or rot away in a year.  After all, it had been mostly assembled in a factory – indoors where it never rained.  So why didn’t the modular manufacturer get it right?  They could have sealed up the tops of all the wire chases in the attic.  There was air coming up from the marriage wall gap.  Whose responsibility was that?

We called the factory.  They were apparently shocked!  How could air be leaking at all the outlets?  Using a pressure pan I showed the builder which ones were connected to the outside and which ones weren’t.  It wasn’t all of them.  Attitude in the factory came into play.  Maybe someone had been assigned the task of sealing all those holes but ran out of . . . foam?  attitude? time?  Maybe it was Friday afternoon.

Open Panned Return1

Panned Return

Then there were the ducts.  The only return in the house was a large opening in the living room floor where the joists had been panned  down below.  There was a wind blowing up from the basement (outside the conditioned space) when the blower door was running.

We called the HVAC contractor.  “I sealed every joint with mastic!  We do that every time.  I don’t know what could have happened.”  Using the theatrical fogger, it was pretty obvious that they hadn’t sealed every joint.  The filter slot was uncovered and beyond that, it was located in such a manner that the gas pipe and some wires would always make it extremely difficult to change the filter.

By this point, the builder recognized that the house was not going to pass and he was not going to get his certificate of occupancy for Monday.   He told me that he would arrange to have the HVAC contractor back and would spend time sealing and tightening up the house.

Open Panned Return

Vision of the Living Room

A week went by before he called me back.  Now, all of this is unfortunately too common, but it was the second visit that really disturbed me.  On the phone the builder said the ducts had been retested and they were fine.  All he need from me was the blower door test.  I asked to see the duct test results.  He said that the HVAC guy was having trouble with his email, but he sent me a photograph of the test results.  I noticed that the building size was wrong.  The results were remarkably good.  I couldn’t read the signature or the name and there wasn’t a BPI or HERS number.   No, the builder said, you don’t need to retest the ducts.  Just do the blow test.

When I got to the house, the builder was running around with his caulking gun again.  Proudly he showed me how the marriage wall had been foamed in the basement.  He said he had talked to the factory but they really hadn’t done much.  I looked at the ducting.  The section of the floor joist panning was wide open at the end.  You could see the daylight of the grille in the living room.  There was absolutely no way that the testing could have had the results that it did.

While we were in the basement, the HVAC contractor showed  up and started caulking around the floor boots.  If the ducts were so tight, why was he still trying to make them tighter?  I showed him the open panned return.  “Don’t know how that could have happened!  We had a guy who was doing bad work.  I had to let him go.”

I asked him about the guy who tested the ducts.  “Oh, he’s just a guy that works for me.  Does this once in awhile.”

So the duct testing was a lie.  It was a lie by an employee who worked for the HVAC contractor.  The builder accepted it and refused to let me retest the ducts once the HVAC company had worked on them.  He wanted the CO and he wanted to be done with the job.

This situation was obvious: the end of the ducting was wide open.  Without my testing, they would never have known.  The system would have been running that way for its entire existence.  Even with my testing, the builder was willing to accept the results and walk away.  The HVAC contractor was willing to accept the results and walk away and complain about onerous rules and regulations.  The homeowner would have gotten a shoddy product and the building inspector would have received invalid information and had to accept it because he couldn’t recheck the result due to lack of time and money.

If we are going to make this system work and have any value, at the very least there ought to be simple ways to verify the credentials of the people doing the testing.  There ought to be a way for QCI inspectors to ding the contractor or the builder for making stuff up.  I want to believe that this was a learning experience for both the builder and the HVAC contractor and that they will do better next time.  But when I saw those original duct testing results from the HVAC contractor, I didn’t believe them.  Should I have compelled the builder to let me retest?  Obviously the ducting system would have failed miserably.  If it had been a health and safety situation, there would have been no question.  But it was a performance and long term durability question.  Are there shades of gray in residential construction morality?


 

If you are planning to challenge the BPI Quality Control Inspector’s certification, you might find the Quality Control Inspector’s Residential Handbook helpful.  Scheduled for publication on June 1, 2015.  For updates and a discount on publication, please add your name and email address by clicking on the book below.

QCI Handbook Cover copy

Visit us at www.HeyokaSolutions.com